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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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Is Content the New Currency?

Is Content the New Currency? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Between the endless Euro drama and the Bitcoin brouhaha, currency has been much in the news of late. Most people would probably name the US Dollar as the dominant currency in this day and age.
janlgordon's insight:


Interesting article from Fast Company written by Geoffrey Colon.


Today the word currency is being used frequently - in this context - the new currency is content in the online world. It has particular meaning to me and many of us who curate or create content to engage, inform and build communities for a variety of reasons.


Content that has substance, informs, meets the needs of the audience gains trust - trust builds relationships, relationships can lead to commerce, communities with shared interests, knowledge networks, innovation and much more.


Here are a few things that caught my attention:


Content creates equity much like stocks and bonds. The more subject matter expertise a brand brings to the table, the more business they can create. This expertise is displayed in the form of content


Financial transactions ussed to buy status. Now, content buys earned trust.


Content has meaning beyond the data it contains. It can be shared and exchanged with others to acquire additional knowledge—much like a traditional currency.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: http://bit.ly/12EYggv


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janlgordon's comment, June 19, 2013 12:38 AM
Mithu Hassan Sorry I'm so late in getting back to you - you're very welcome, happy you liked it!!
santina kerslake's curator insight, September 5, 2013 3:11 PM

Do people actually read the content? Will it keep them following you?

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Content Curators are the New Superheros of the Web

Content Curators are the New Superheros of the Web | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Steven Rosenbaum has an interesting article on Fast Company, outlining the reasons why curation is here to stay and the importance that curators will play in your information consumption diet.

 

He writes: "...So anyone who steps up and volunteers to curate in their area of knowledge and passion is taking on a Herculean task.

 

They're going to stand between the web and their readers, using all of the tools at their disposal to "listen" to the web, and then pull out of the data stream nuggets of wisdom, breaking news, important new voices, and other salient details.

 

It's real work, and requires a tireless commitment to being engaged and ready to rebroadcast timely material.

 

While there may be an economic benefit for being a "thought leader" and "trusted curator," it's not going to happen overnight.

 

Which is to say, being a superhero is often a thankless job.

 

The growth in content, both in terms of pure volume and the speed of publishing, has raised some questions about what best practices are in the curation space."

 

He also has some pretty straightforward advice on what, as a curator, you should never do:

 

"1. If you don't add context, or opinion, or voice and simply lift content, it's stealing.

 

2. If you don't provide attribution, and a link back to the source, it's stealing.

 

3. If you take a large portion of the original content, it's stealing.

 

4. If someone asks you not to curate their material, and you don't respect that request, it's stealing.

 

5. Respect published rights. If images don't allow creative commons use, reach out to the image creator--don't just grab it and ask questions later."

 

And he definitely has a point on all of these. 

 

Recommended. 7/10

 

Read the full article: http://www.fastcompany.com/1834177/content-curators-are-the-new-superheros-of-the-web?partner=rss 


Via Robin Good
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Jonathan Rattray Clark's comment, April 18, 2012 1:14 AM
Scooping it .........thanks Robin I really like your curation .... And value your wisdom ......it seems there is purpose to my constant information minning as and educator artist and passionate information collector .......I find it incredibly exciting to find fresh thinking and response to the living world around us and in particular our individual passions. Thank you for your wisdom
Robin Good's comment, April 18, 2012 1:16 AM
Thank you Jonathan. Glad to be of help and inspiration to you.

Tony Gu's comment, April 20, 2012 1:30 AM
I am really enjoying reading this article.
I found that the way Robin Good curate this article truly practice the ‘No Stealing’ rules. Thanks for sharing this with all of us. Big up!
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How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation”

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation” | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Heba Hosny, a guest blogger for Lauralee Walker


This article is full of wonderful tips for taking your curation to the next level and embellish your original content.


"Content curation rewards are not limited to branding and SEO; it can also enhance the visibility and the quality of your own content."


There are many things that caught my attention, here are just a few gems:


Curated Content Can Inspire Topics For Created Content


If you don't master this one, all the other tips won't make any sense


****Understand which topics are irresistible to your target audience


My Commentary:


I love this one!


Here's the tip


****Instead of taking the easy route of sharing the topic with your audience, write a blog post to "build on" it.


You can build on a topic in different ways:


**Beg to differ politely


**Provide additional tips and insights


**Ask clarifying question(s)


My Commentary:


This is a great way to add "context" it can start conversations, which invites others to add their comments, bring new observations and more information about a particular topic.


**A perfect segue to building relationships, community, doing business and increasing knowledge.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sJs2I8]

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janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:21 PM
Hi Beth,
I agree with you, I love the feeling of community and the collective wisdom, and you know "curation resonates with me":-)
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:22 PM
Thanks so much for rescooping and sharing on twitter:-)
Pittsburgh Tote Bag Project's comment, November 25, 2011 9:17 PM
This has me thinking critically about how we are integrating social media. Inviting interaction has been a huge challenge. We are stimulating new conversations in real world time, but that's not reflected in comments and so forth. I like using Scoop.It widgets to get the newest scoop onto the bog in a timely manner and take some time to reflect on post content.
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Content Curation - Choosing the Right Topic - What You Need To Know

Content Curation - Choosing the Right Topic - What You Need To Know | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This post was written by Sue McKittrick for Marketing to Business Executives Blog.


My commentary: In writing this post, Sue clearly demonstrates how to curate content effectively. She refers to Pawan Deshpande's post on Crafting the Perfect Content Curation Strategy and then takes it to another level. This is the kind of "context" that is valuable to your readers. 


Pawan points to three factors to consider in selection of the right topic:


*competitors' content strategies

*the volume of content on a subject

*audience interest


Sue says these three things are definitely important but some refinements are in order and she delivers the goods in this article. We may have read these things before but are we really taking it all in and applying it to our work as curators or for building our business?


Here's what particularly caught my attention:


**Think about what is compelling to your targets. What information do they need to do their jobs? Where are major changes underway that will affect their success?


****Look at your answers to those questions through the prism of your business, products or services.


****What is the storyline that connects your products or services to information needed to do their jobs

 

**or**


** the actions they will need to take to respond to important changes occurring in their business?


I love this one!


****Consider the issues associated with the topics under consideration.


**Will exploration of the issues provoke rich discussion


**A discerning perspective on controversial views will draw more attention and offer more opportunities for engagement.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sS17vz]

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Twitter Can be a Powerful Discovery Engine for Curators & Brands IF You Use it Wisely

Twitter Can be a Powerful Discovery Engine for Curators & Brands IF You Use it Wisely | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This post was written by, Bill Gurley, a VC - Benchmark Capital, which is a major investor in twitter for his  blog Abovethecrowd.


My commentary:


Bill clarifies what Twitter is and what it is not. I found it extremely well written and very helpful. I also found some of the comments from readers to be interesting. More than one person thought this was a shameless promotion of Twitter, being that he is an investor.   Maybe it was but I have personally gotten tremendous value from Twitter for over five years and after reading this, it crystalized a few  more things in my mind and I will leverage that knowledge in the future


And I feel compelled to ask: are the opinions of an investor automatically flawed?  If I loved a product enough and had the means to make a substantial investment in it, I would consider that being me "putting my money where my mouth is" and would hope that those who perhaps used to listen to me extolling the virtues of the product before I invested, would see my opinion as no less valid after I became a part-owner.


**I say don't throw the baby out with the bath-water:-).


Intro:


"Frequent comparisons to Facebook leave many confused about the true value of Twitter."


Here are just a few gems that caught my attention:


****For the vast majority of Twitter’s next 900 million users, the core usage modality will have very little to do with “tweeting,” and everything to do withlistening” or “hearing.”


****Twitter is a "discovery engine” and an “information utility” rolled into one. With Twitter, you get news faster


****Twitter is highly asymmetric.  The majority of users get value from "reading" or "listening" to the tweets from core influencers.


****In many ways, Twitter is much more of a competitor to other “discovery tools” and “information sourcesthan it is to Facebook


****Twitter has three breakthroughs that make it dramatically more powerful than simple RSS.


****First and foremost, your personalized Twitter feed is human-curated by a potential universe of millions of curators.


****When you “check Twitter” you are looking at the specific articles and links purposefully chosen by people you have chosen to follow.


****That is powerful leverage


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/vcLo1m]

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The Curated Web

The Curated Web | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Brittany Morin wrote this piece for the Huffington Post


I thought this was good article, great observations and a real grasp on curation and how to do it effectively. I'm going to refrain from reposting all the gems in this post  and instead give a commentary on something she said which I thought was a bit shortsighted.  


Here's what caught my attention:


"I believe that the people best poised to be curators of the Internet are those from the Facebook Generation -- the first generation of native web citizens, mainly people in their 20s or early 30s who have grown up with the web and can navigate, scour, synthesize and then publish the best of what's out there on a daily basis because they practically live online. It is our generation that will also be able to more easily understand where new opportunities lie because they can quickly pinpoint where the gaps are in content, services, and products."


My response:


She is right that people in their 20's or 30's are indeed well equipped to curate the web especially for their own age group as well as others for all the reasons she states.


Having said that, there are people of all ages who have been on the web for years, myself included, who have built relationships and have the ability to spot trends, gaps and potential opportunities. I seriously doubt that people in that age group know what people in their 40's, 50's & 60's might need in a trusted source or have access or the ability to ferret out every potential opportunity on the web. I would be careful about making global statements like that.


**What if people of all ages contributed to a topic together, can you imagine the collective intelligence that could come from that?


What will set a good curator apart from a person who just aggregates links is the context they can add.  Their perspective will have been gained through the humility and wisdom of life experience and can add great richness to the original content.  To be sure, I have met many wonderful GenYers who have these traits in abundance, but this is one area where a few extra years and a few extra miles can help.


Content is the new currency of the web, it is meant to be a door opener, to invite others into the conversation, building thought leadership and authority. The more people that contribute by giving comments or adding another level of context, not only does it add to our knowledge but it can build community.


I think there is an enormous opportunity for anyone who has the passion, knowledge expertise and committment to select the very best content, fact check for accuracy and is willing to put in the time to learn how to curate succesfully.


Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://huff.to/v7bGHt]

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Ove Christensen's comment, November 17, 2011 4:03 AM
Quality curation is not based on age gruoups but on engagement, openness, knowledge, context and a lot of other stuff - but claiming that a curators age is something of particular interest is rubbish to me.
janlgordon's comment, November 17, 2011 11:53 AM
Hi Ove, As you know I agree with you - curation is moving towards "collective intelligence" it's a wonderful time to expand our knowledge, build community and who knows what lies beyond the horizon.
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Measuring Online Influence & It’s Impact On Social Media

Measuring Online Influence & It’s Impact On Social Media | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it


Robert Dempsey of Dempsey Marketing interviewed Andrew Grill of PeopleBrowsr, the developers of Kred.


Measuring online influence seems to be pretty hot in the marketing world these days.


The interview is split into 2 Youtube videos and will take 37 minutes of your time to watch them both, but


**I can assure you that if you have an interest in Influence Metrics, your time will be very well spent!


Here's a synopsis:


PeopleBrowsr pays Twitter for their Firehose.


For better or worse, this means that they have access to EVERY Tweet dating back to 2008 – a total of 55Bn (from approx. 100m @names) at the time of the interview, raising by approximately 1 billion each week, or 10,000 a second.


Each of us can imagine some possible negative ramifications for Twitter selling our Tweets to whoever pays the fee,


**but this particular project is all about helping people and businesses.


Grill sets up his thoughts on Influence by relating the difference between him being at a Networking event and traditional

advertising.


He would scope the crowd looking for people who look interesting, stand near them and listen for a while, finally interjecting himself into the conversation when he feels he can add something.


This, contrasting with the traditional method of advertising: going into a crowd with a megaphone!


Kred currently has two measurements:


Influence score by local community, It will create communities based around locale and sphere of influence.


He defines Influence as changing people’s minds or getting them to take an action.


Outreach score: This shows your generosity of sharing and thanking people for their tweets or recommendations


People will be able to go back any number of days to see tweets of people who interest them.


Kred will train people, not necessarily in how to raise their scores, bu]t in how to make use of what their numbers are telling them.


**Another aspect of Kred is that people can be awarded points for ‘offline influence’, such as awards they may have received



**Grill admits that it will be a couple of years before scoring platforms are able to bring people everything they might wish to see, but feels that we are on the right path.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article & listen to interview here: [http://bit.ly/sLc2el]

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30 Ways to Build the “Know, Like, and Trust” Factor that Grows an Audience

30 Ways to Build the “Know, Like, and Trust” Factor that Grows an Audience | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Your content is good. You know your material. You know how to put words together in a way people want to read. You're nearly there. But the game isn't
janlgordon's insight:

I loved this article by copyblogger, it's one of those pieces that is full of great insights and strategy to help you focus on why you're online, who you're speaking to and how to create an impact and build a vital community.


Everyone of these suggestions is great, here are the ones that caught my attention:


10 Ways to Get Known Online


Great high-quality content marketing attracts attention, builds your reputation-it lets people see who you are and why you're worth listening to.


**Get a clear on who you're talking to: Identify your buyer personna and tightly position your content for that buyer.


**Be relevant: Listen, research, and ask questions to discover your audience’s pinch points. Package your ideas into thought-provoking blog posts, share solutions on a webinar, or drip ideas through an autoresponder.


**Get your social media ratio right. Remember the 95% relationship building, 5% selling formula.


**Be generous: Share content and promote other people. Don’t expect people to share your stuff if you don’t demonstrate a commitment to do the same.


**Initiate a two-way conversation: Invite your audience to engage and interact with you. Invite comments on your blog posts


10 factors that build trust with your audience


While you’re delivering your truly valuable content, you’re not selling, but you are paving the road to eventually selling a product that’s related to your content down the line.


**When it comes to selling online, authority and likeability alone are rarely enough — you need to become truly trusted.


**Give away (some of) your best stuff: The web is swamped with free content. If you want to stand out, even your free offers must be remarkable.


**Be consistently good: Train your audience to expect a certain level of quality from you and constantly deliver. When you do, they’ll come to you first rather than going elsewhere.


**Give your audience space: Use content to allow your audience to choose you — in their own time. Whether they come to you in a day, a week, or a decade, you’ll get far more respect than that sleazy salesman who just won’t go away.


Takeaway:


**When you combine the elements of know, like, and trust to your content and actions, magic ignites.


**You become an authority on your subject, and you build a tribe of fiercely loyal followers who can ultimately become loyal customers.


Selected and Reviewed by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


See full article here: [http://bit.ly/We01fT]


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Jeff Domansky's comment, January 17, 2013 2:48 PM
Jan, I always enjoy your curation. Keep the great material coming.
janlgordon's comment, January 19, 2013 12:36 AM
Thanks so much Jeff Domansky, I really appreciate your kind words!
Joe Winpisinger's comment, January 26, 2013 11:19 PM
Outstanding article... blogging is harder than most people think and that is why so many quit.... My blog is finally starting to pay off after a long while.... have to keep going even when only a few are reading... thanks...
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7 Roadblocks To Content Curation - What You Need to Know

7 Roadblocks To Content Curation - What You Need to Know | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This post was written by Romain Goday from Darwineco. The insights and suggestions in this article are excellent because they articulate the problem so clearly.


When you can see something in this light, it makes it easier to create a plan of action that is effective. This takes time but it can be done. More about this in the weeks to come, stay tuned.


Excerpt:


We all want to be sure we are not missing important information. This post explores 7 roadblocks that are an impediment to curation.


**What differentiates successful professionals is their ability to take action before competitors so as to mitigate a risk or act upon an opportunity.


Here are a few things that caught my attention:


**Finding timely and relevant information on an ongoing basis about a specific subject is very challenging


Circles of Trust


**Today's information consumption is largely dependent on whom users "follow" online: social media connections, news sites (groups of publishers), bloggers and other information providers.


****It is easy to forget that critical information might come from outside those circles of trust.


**Most information is available on the Web, but focusing on the right information requires users to combine various tools in very creative ways


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/yMrqbx]

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Interview with Andrew Grill CEO of PeopleBrowsr (Kred): Timely and relevant

Interview with Andrew Grill CEO of PeopleBrowsr (Kred): Timely and relevant | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

I posted this piece a few weeks ago and thought I'd do it again today because it's definitely something to watch in 2012.


I was on a tweet chat last night with the people from Kred and from what I heard, these people really are going to play a very important role in  reputation measurement. They seem to be transparent, willing to answer questions and respect the fact that we want to know how they come up with our scores.  They have a completely different system from their competitor.


Great interview by my friend, Robert Dempsey!


Robert Dempsey of Dempsey Marketing interviewed Andrew Grill, CEO of PeopleBrowsr, the developers of Kred.


Measuring online influence seems to be pretty hot in the marketing world these days.


The interview is split into 2 Youtube videos and will take 37 minutes of your time to watch them both, but


**I can assure you that if you have an interest in Influence Metrics, your time will be very well spent!


Here's a synopsis:


PeopleBrowsr pays Twitter for their Firehose.


For better or worse, this means that they have access to EVERY Tweet dating back to 2008 – a total of 55Bn (from approx. 100m @names) at the time of the interview, raising by approximately 1 billion each week, or 10,000 a second.


Each of us can imagine some possible negative ramifications for Twitter selling our Tweets to whoever pays the fee,


**but this particular project is all about helping people and businesses.


Grill sets up his thoughts on Influence by relating the difference between him being at a Networking event and traditional

advertising.


He would scope the crowd looking for people who look interesting, stand near them and listen for a while, finally interjecting himself into the conversation when he feels he can add something.


This, contrasting with the traditional method of advertising: going into a crowd with a megaphone!


Kred currently has two measurements:


Influence score by local community, It will create communities based around locale and sphere of influence.


He defines Influence as changing people’s minds or getting them to take an action.


Outreach score: This shows your generosity of sharing and thanking people for their tweets or recommendations


People will be able to go back any number of days to see tweets of people who interest them.


Kred will train people, not necessarily in how to raise their scores, bu]t in how to make use of what their numbers are telling them.


**Another aspect of Kred is that people can be awarded points for ‘offline influence’, such as awards they may have received



**Grill admits that it will be a couple of years before scoring platforms are able to bring people everything they might wish to see, but feels that we are on the right path.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article & listen to interview here: [http://bit.ly/sLc2el]

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How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation”

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation” | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Heba Hosny, a guest blogger for Lauralee Walker


This article is full of wonderful tips for taking your curation to the next level and embellish your original content.


"Content curation rewards are not limited to branding and SEO; it can also enhance the visibility and the quality of your own content."


There are many things that caught my attention, here are just a few gems:


Curated Content Can Inspire Topics For Created Content


If you don't master this one, all the other tips won't make any sense


****Understand which topics are irresistible to your target audience


My Commentary:


I love this one!


Here's the tip


****Instead of taking the easy route of sharing the topic with your audience, write a blog post to "build on" it.


You can build on a topic in different ways:


**Beg to differ politely


**Provide additional tips and insights


**Ask clarifying question(s)


My Commentary:


This is a great way to add "context" it can start conversations, which invites others to add their comments, bring new observations and more information about a particular topic.


**A perfect segue to building relationships, community, doing business and increasing knowledge.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sJs2I8]

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janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:21 PM
Hi Beth,
I agree with you, I love the feeling of community and the collective wisdom, and you know "curation resonates with me":-)
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:22 PM
Thanks so much for rescooping and sharing on twitter:-)
Pittsburgh Tote Bag Project's comment, November 25, 2011 9:17 PM
This has me thinking critically about how we are integrating social media. Inviting interaction has been a huge challenge. We are stimulating new conversations in real world time, but that's not reflected in comments and so forth. I like using Scoop.It widgets to get the newest scoop onto the bog in a timely manner and take some time to reflect on post content.
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Are Content Curators the power behind social media influence?

I posted this piece by Neicole Crepeau some months ago but if you're like me, you can capture something you didn't see before the second time around.


This was worth a second read and I did come away with some takeaways that seem more like a possibility rather than just words because curation is going to heat up in 2012 and this is exciting news for all of us who are curators.


There are also some questions and answers that will reveal themselves in the coming year.


**Pay attention to the comments, Lots of good discussion in the original post. (I like that):-)


Here's what caught my attention:


Why are these folks important? Because they are influencers.


If the Curator is the new Google,


**we can expect businesses to optimize for the Curator just as they optimized for Search on the web.


****In this new world, Curators become a commodity and they have value that will be sought after.


**Marketers will seek curators in specific topic areas and with specific traits.


Marketers will want to know:


**The topics this person curates and the networks and communities he/she curates to.


**Curators who are plugged into niche communities and forums may be even more valuable.The number of connections on those networks. The volume or following always counts.


**The types of connections the curator has

.

**Reshare value. How many of this curator’s followers reshare the content, and how wide a net do they cast?


As this kind of information becomes more readily available through tools, the question is what happens when marketers seek and court Curators?


**Do Curators find a way to monetize their services, as Google did?


**Would that lessen their impact?


**How do Curators change what they do as they become a valuable and sought-after resource?


**What kind of markets, businesses, and products revolve around the new commodity of Curators?


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article and the comments here: [http://bit.ly/mzCp9u]


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Building Thought Leadership through Content Curation

This slide Presentation given at WebCom Montreal, November 16, 2011 by Corinne Weisgerber. 


I really liked her presentation, I'm sure you will too.


Here's what caught my attention:


She quotes from Robert Scoble, and I think he really captured the essence of a good curator.


"A curator is an information chemist . He or she mixes atoms together in a way to build an information molecule then adds value to that molecule"


A few essential takeaways:


*Identify your niche

*Find content sources

*Aggregate what you observe

*Contextualize -

*(there are many ways to add context - you point out patterns, trends, pull out a few points that gives your readers the gist of what the article is about. Anything that helps others to find meaning and utilize the information in their business is what is important).


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


See full slideshow here [http://slidesha.re/sW85V6]


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Beth Kanter's comment, November 17, 2011 3:04 AM
I like her steps too, although I tend to present them in a more simplified way for my audience. Great find.
janlgordon's comment, November 17, 2011 11:51 AM
Hi Beth - Good point, the simpler the better, I agree with you:-)
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Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is

Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Bob Brown of Network World has curated news of two very interesting Twitter research projects that caught my attention.


We all agree that freedom of speech is good,  and it's great that everyone can now  become a publisher. However, there's a double-edged sword: If we speak to a friend before we think something though, all will surely be forgiven and forgotten. After all, we all make mistakes. But if you click that Tweet or Share button too quickly, either succumbing to knee-jerk reactions or without first checking the facts, you may find the digital world to be less forgiving.


Content curators have to be especially vigilent about curating someone else's content to make sure the facts and information are correct.


I believe the research related to here is essential reading, as it is furtherment of an established and growing trend:


One relates to Wellesley College's Department of Computer Science where two professors have been awarded a near half million dollar National Science Foundation grant to:


****build an application that gauges the trustworthiness of information shared on social networks, and in particular Twitter.


This was originally envisioned as a form of spammer identification, but


****has broadened to be able to determine the past history of a tweeter and also whether information being received is available from multiple sources. 


The other brings us news of 'Tweetographer', a huge Data Mining project by two University of Cincinatti Computer Science students, descibed as:


"a real-time events guide extracted from information coming via large numbers of tweets." 


This could be available as a web or mobile app at the end of the year and one of the co-creators, Billy Clifton (his partner is Alex Padgett)


**sees the uses expanding in the future to predict election results and compiling product reviews.


My takeaways are:


**that we all need to be very aware that what we tweet today can and may be used against us in the future


**search is still very much in its infancy when it comes to engine sophistication, stay tuned.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/s00504]

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