Curation, Social ...
Follow
Find tag "resource"
113.0K views | +0 today
Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
Curated by janlgordon
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by janlgordon from Content Curation World
Scoop.it!

Curation Tools That Help You Find Hidden Gems That Nobody Else Is Posting

Rob Diana writes: "The core of my concern is that curators need tools to find those stories that may not be as popular as others.

Otherwise, all news comes from a few select sites that are read by the masses. Obviously, this is not what we want to have happen.
"

 

He couldn't be more right. 

The rest of his article, dating back to November, offers good insight into what the 1% of former Google Reader was really doing and what they are looking for now that it is gone.

 

Insightful. 8/10


Curated and Selected by by Robin Good


 

Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/tCbIPj]


Via Robin Good
more...
janlgordon's comment, December 18, 2011 2:57 PM
Hi Robin,
This is a good one - thanks for sharing this!!
Jan
Rescooped by janlgordon from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Interview with Andrew Grill CEO of PeopleBrowsr (Kred): Timely and relevant

Interview with Andrew Grill CEO of PeopleBrowsr (Kred): Timely and relevant | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

I posted this piece a few weeks ago and thought I'd do it again today because it's definitely something to watch in 2012.


I was on a tweet chat last night with the people from Kred and from what I heard, these people really are going to play a very important role in  reputation measurement. They seem to be transparent, willing to answer questions and respect the fact that we want to know how they come up with our scores.  They have a completely different system from their competitor.


Great interview by my friend, Robert Dempsey!


Robert Dempsey of Dempsey Marketing interviewed Andrew Grill, CEO of PeopleBrowsr, the developers of Kred.


Measuring online influence seems to be pretty hot in the marketing world these days.


The interview is split into 2 Youtube videos and will take 37 minutes of your time to watch them both, but


**I can assure you that if you have an interest in Influence Metrics, your time will be very well spent!


Here's a synopsis:


PeopleBrowsr pays Twitter for their Firehose.


For better or worse, this means that they have access to EVERY Tweet dating back to 2008 – a total of 55Bn (from approx. 100m @names) at the time of the interview, raising by approximately 1 billion each week, or 10,000 a second.


Each of us can imagine some possible negative ramifications for Twitter selling our Tweets to whoever pays the fee,


**but this particular project is all about helping people and businesses.


Grill sets up his thoughts on Influence by relating the difference between him being at a Networking event and traditional

advertising.


He would scope the crowd looking for people who look interesting, stand near them and listen for a while, finally interjecting himself into the conversation when he feels he can add something.


This, contrasting with the traditional method of advertising: going into a crowd with a megaphone!


Kred currently has two measurements:


Influence score by local community, It will create communities based around locale and sphere of influence.


He defines Influence as changing people’s minds or getting them to take an action.


Outreach score: This shows your generosity of sharing and thanking people for their tweets or recommendations


People will be able to go back any number of days to see tweets of people who interest them.


Kred will train people, not necessarily in how to raise their scores, bu]t in how to make use of what their numbers are telling them.


**Another aspect of Kred is that people can be awarded points for ‘offline influence’, such as awards they may have received



**Grill admits that it will be a couple of years before scoring platforms are able to bring people everything they might wish to see, but feels that we are on the right path.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article & listen to interview here: [http://bit.ly/sLc2el]

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by janlgordon from Curation & The Future of Publishing
Scoop.it!

The Demise of Quality Content on the Web - The Rise of Great Content Curators

The Demise of Quality Content on the Web - The Rise of Great Content Curators | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This a great blog post from Rian van der Merwe , describing the noise you can find on the web now, and especially content just created for SEO purposes or advertisers. As many, Rian is tired of it.


Rian speaks for many of us who are overwhelmed, overloaded with content that gives us no value at all. This is the problem


Of course, we’re never going to agree on what “quality content” means. It’s one of those “you know it when you see it” things, and everyone’s definition will be different. Still, my personal view is that quality content presents two or more of the following components: (1) new information, (2) interpretation of information, and/or (3) a well considered personal opinion about what the information means. ↩Wait, who am I to decide what people should and shouldn’t read? You’re absolutely right, I can’t do that so I should get off my high horse and let people read whatever they want to read. This is an opinion piece. ↩

 


Here's what caught my attention:


Of course, we’re never going to agree on what “quality content” means. It’s one of those “you know it when you see it” things, and everyone’s definition will be different. Still,


**My personal view is that quality content presents two or more of the following components:


(1) new information


(2) interpretation of information, and/or


(3) a well considered personal opinion about what the information means. ↩Wait, who am I to decide what people should and shouldn’t read? You’re absolutely right, I can’t do that so I should get off my high horse and let people read whatever they want to read. This is an opinion piece. ↩




My input:


****The Opportunity: This is the time for all good curators to come forward - 2012 will be the year of the content curator -


**Know your audience

**Know their pain points

**Find and select the best content, add your own opinions, information or anything that will provide more value for your audience

**Select only the best content, don't just aggregate links that add to the noise

**Become a trusted resource - many opportunities will come to you, it's your time to shine


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/tF0opI]



Via axelletess
more...
Karen Dietz's comment, December 4, 2011 12:23 PM
Great post and comments Jan! Looking forward to 2012.
janlgordon's comment, December 4, 2011 2:59 PM
@Karen Dietz

Thanks Karen! 2012 is going to be an amazing year for all of us!!
Gust MEES's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:39 AM

Quality Matters!

A MUST read!!!

Check also:

http://www.scoop.it/webwizard

http://www.scoop.it/t/the-scoop-it-spotlight

http://blog.scoop.it/en/2011/11/30/lord-of-curation-series-gust-mees/

 

Scooped by janlgordon
Scoop.it!

The Curated Web

The Curated Web | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Brittany Morin wrote this piece for the Huffington Post


I thought this was good article, great observations and a real grasp on curation and how to do it effectively. I'm going to refrain from reposting all the gems in this post  and instead give a commentary on something she said which I thought was a bit shortsighted.  


Here's what caught my attention:


"I believe that the people best poised to be curators of the Internet are those from the Facebook Generation -- the first generation of native web citizens, mainly people in their 20s or early 30s who have grown up with the web and can navigate, scour, synthesize and then publish the best of what's out there on a daily basis because they practically live online. It is our generation that will also be able to more easily understand where new opportunities lie because they can quickly pinpoint where the gaps are in content, services, and products."


My response:


She is right that people in their 20's or 30's are indeed well equipped to curate the web especially for their own age group as well as others for all the reasons she states.


Having said that, there are people of all ages who have been on the web for years, myself included, who have built relationships and have the ability to spot trends, gaps and potential opportunities. I seriously doubt that people in that age group know what people in their 40's, 50's & 60's might need in a trusted source or have access or the ability to ferret out every potential opportunity on the web. I would be careful about making global statements like that.


**What if people of all ages contributed to a topic together, can you imagine the collective intelligence that could come from that?


What will set a good curator apart from a person who just aggregates links is the context they can add.  Their perspective will have been gained through the humility and wisdom of life experience and can add great richness to the original content.  To be sure, I have met many wonderful GenYers who have these traits in abundance, but this is one area where a few extra years and a few extra miles can help.


Content is the new currency of the web, it is meant to be a door opener, to invite others into the conversation, building thought leadership and authority. The more people that contribute by giving comments or adding another level of context, not only does it add to our knowledge but it can build community.


I think there is an enormous opportunity for anyone who has the passion, knowledge expertise and committment to select the very best content, fact check for accuracy and is willing to put in the time to learn how to curate succesfully.


Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://huff.to/v7bGHt]

more...
Ove Christensen's comment, November 17, 2011 4:03 AM
Quality curation is not based on age gruoups but on engagement, openness, knowledge, context and a lot of other stuff - but claiming that a curators age is something of particular interest is rubbish to me.
janlgordon's comment, November 17, 2011 11:53 AM
Hi Ove, As you know I agree with you - curation is moving towards "collective intelligence" it's a wonderful time to expand our knowledge, build community and who knows what lies beyond the horizon.
Scooped by janlgordon
Scoop.it!

Measuring Online Influence & It’s Impact On Social Media

Measuring Online Influence & It’s Impact On Social Media | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it


Robert Dempsey of Dempsey Marketing interviewed Andrew Grill of PeopleBrowsr, the developers of Kred.


Measuring online influence seems to be pretty hot in the marketing world these days.


The interview is split into 2 Youtube videos and will take 37 minutes of your time to watch them both, but


**I can assure you that if you have an interest in Influence Metrics, your time will be very well spent!


Here's a synopsis:


PeopleBrowsr pays Twitter for their Firehose.


For better or worse, this means that they have access to EVERY Tweet dating back to 2008 – a total of 55Bn (from approx. 100m @names) at the time of the interview, raising by approximately 1 billion each week, or 10,000 a second.


Each of us can imagine some possible negative ramifications for Twitter selling our Tweets to whoever pays the fee,


**but this particular project is all about helping people and businesses.


Grill sets up his thoughts on Influence by relating the difference between him being at a Networking event and traditional

advertising.


He would scope the crowd looking for people who look interesting, stand near them and listen for a while, finally interjecting himself into the conversation when he feels he can add something.


This, contrasting with the traditional method of advertising: going into a crowd with a megaphone!


Kred currently has two measurements:


Influence score by local community, It will create communities based around locale and sphere of influence.


He defines Influence as changing people’s minds or getting them to take an action.


Outreach score: This shows your generosity of sharing and thanking people for their tweets or recommendations


People will be able to go back any number of days to see tweets of people who interest them.


Kred will train people, not necessarily in how to raise their scores, bu]t in how to make use of what their numbers are telling them.


**Another aspect of Kred is that people can be awarded points for ‘offline influence’, such as awards they may have received



**Grill admits that it will be a couple of years before scoring platforms are able to bring people everything they might wish to see, but feels that we are on the right path.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article & listen to interview here: [http://bit.ly/sLc2el]

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by janlgordon from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation”

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation” | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Heba Hosny, a guest blogger for Lauralee Walker


This article is full of wonderful tips for taking your curation to the next level and embellish your original content.


"Content curation rewards are not limited to branding and SEO; it can also enhance the visibility and the quality of your own content."


There are many things that caught my attention, here are just a few gems:


Curated Content Can Inspire Topics For Created Content


If you don't master this one, all the other tips won't make any sense


****Understand which topics are irresistible to your target audience


My Commentary:


I love this one!


Here's the tip


****Instead of taking the easy route of sharing the topic with your audience, write a blog post to "build on" it.


You can build on a topic in different ways:


**Beg to differ politely


**Provide additional tips and insights


**Ask clarifying question(s)


My Commentary:


This is a great way to add "context" it can start conversations, which invites others to add their comments, bring new observations and more information about a particular topic.


**A perfect segue to building relationships, community, doing business and increasing knowledge.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sJs2I8]

more...
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:21 PM
Hi Beth,
I agree with you, I love the feeling of community and the collective wisdom, and you know "curation resonates with me":-)
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:22 PM
Thanks so much for rescooping and sharing on twitter:-)
Pittsburgh Tote Bag Project's comment, November 25, 2011 9:17 PM
This has me thinking critically about how we are integrating social media. Inviting interaction has been a huge challenge. We are stimulating new conversations in real world time, but that's not reflected in comments and so forth. I like using Scoop.It widgets to get the newest scoop onto the bog in a timely manner and take some time to reflect on post content.
Scooped by janlgordon
Scoop.it!

Content Curation - Choosing the Right Topic - What You Need To Know

Content Curation - Choosing the Right Topic - What You Need To Know | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This post was written by Sue McKittrick for Marketing to Business Executives Blog.


My commentary: In writing this post, Sue clearly demonstrates how to curate content effectively. She refers to Pawan Deshpande's post on Crafting the Perfect Content Curation Strategy and then takes it to another level. This is the kind of "context" that is valuable to your readers. 


Pawan points to three factors to consider in selection of the right topic:


*competitors' content strategies

*the volume of content on a subject

*audience interest


Sue says these three things are definitely important but some refinements are in order and she delivers the goods in this article. We may have read these things before but are we really taking it all in and applying it to our work as curators or for building our business?


Here's what particularly caught my attention:


**Think about what is compelling to your targets. What information do they need to do their jobs? Where are major changes underway that will affect their success?


****Look at your answers to those questions through the prism of your business, products or services.


****What is the storyline that connects your products or services to information needed to do their jobs

 

**or**


** the actions they will need to take to respond to important changes occurring in their business?


I love this one!


****Consider the issues associated with the topics under consideration.


**Will exploration of the issues provoke rich discussion


**A discerning perspective on controversial views will draw more attention and offer more opportunities for engagement.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sS17vz]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by janlgordon
Scoop.it!

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation”

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation” | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Heba Hosny, a guest blogger for Lauralee Walker


This article is full of wonderful tips for taking your curation to the next level and embellish your original content.


"Content curation rewards are not limited to branding and SEO; it can also enhance the visibility and the quality of your own content."


There are many things that caught my attention, here are just a few gems:


Curated Content Can Inspire Topics For Created Content


If you don't master this one, all the other tips won't make any sense


****Understand which topics are irresistible to your target audience


My Commentary:


I love this one!


Here's the tip


****Instead of taking the easy route of sharing the topic with your audience, write a blog post to "build on" it.


You can build on a topic in different ways:


**Beg to differ politely


**Provide additional tips and insights


**Ask clarifying question(s)


My Commentary:


This is a great way to add "context" it can start conversations, which invites others to add their comments, bring new observations and more information about a particular topic.


**A perfect segue to building relationships, community, doing business and increasing knowledge.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sJs2I8]

more...
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:21 PM
Hi Beth,
I agree with you, I love the feeling of community and the collective wisdom, and you know "curation resonates with me":-)
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:22 PM
Thanks so much for rescooping and sharing on twitter:-)
Pittsburgh Tote Bag Project's comment, November 25, 2011 9:17 PM
This has me thinking critically about how we are integrating social media. Inviting interaction has been a huge challenge. We are stimulating new conversations in real world time, but that's not reflected in comments and so forth. I like using Scoop.It widgets to get the newest scoop onto the bog in a timely manner and take some time to reflect on post content.
Rescooped by janlgordon from Social Media Content Curation
Scoop.it!

Building Thought Leadership through Content Curation

This slide Presentation given at WebCom Montreal, November 16, 2011 by Corinne Weisgerber. 


I really liked her presentation, I'm sure you will too.


Here's what caught my attention:


She quotes from Robert Scoble, and I think he really captured the essence of a good curator.


"A curator is an information chemist . He or she mixes atoms together in a way to build an information molecule then adds value to that molecule"


A few essential takeaways:


*Identify your niche

*Find content sources

*Aggregate what you observe

*Contextualize -

*(there are many ways to add context - you point out patterns, trends, pull out a few points that gives your readers the gist of what the article is about. Anything that helps others to find meaning and utilize the information in their business is what is important).


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


See full slideshow here [http://slidesha.re/sW85V6]


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, November 17, 2011 3:04 AM
I like her steps too, although I tend to present them in a more simplified way for my audience. Great find.
janlgordon's comment, November 17, 2011 11:51 AM
Hi Beth - Good point, the simpler the better, I agree with you:-)
Scooped by janlgordon
Scoop.it!

Content Marketers Can Learn From Journalists - What You Need to Know

Content Marketers Can Learn From Journalists - What You Need to Know | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This thought provoking piece was written by Anum Hussain, (Media Enthusiast) for Hubspot.


Curated by JanLGordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond" on scoopit.


"Because content creation is core to inbound marketing, part of being a marketer now means being some form of a journalist. Therefore, to find success in inbound marketing, marketers must now master the art of marketalism."


These are my takeaways and what I would do I'm mostly a curator so I've geared my points to what I do. One thing about doing this is that I really learn everytime I delve into a piece to bring some clairity or offer some suggestions for you.


1. Post IMPORTANT content often -


Today we have so many ways of sourcing, quality material. Make sure your pick a topic that you can consistently bring new insights, resources, tools, strategy and understanding for your followers. Become known as an SME (subject matter expert) on this topic. (Reporters always have a topic they cover).


2. Lead Focus Groups Like a Reporter -


We have Smart Lists on Facebook, Circles on Google+, the ability to lead or participate in  tweetchat. Use these outlets to gather information, opionions and knowledge from your peers to help you add depth and insight to what you're posting.


3. Drop a Beat


The same applies here, use social networks to crowdsource your content. None of us knows everything about a topic. We have our core strengths and should concentrate our efforts in these areas. The important thing is to have a strategy. You're online for a reason. Your content says who you are. Utilize social media, methodically, find a niche and become known for it.


4. Understand Your Audience


This is fairly obvious...........


Read more:


http://bit.ly/pjrOfy

more...
No comment yet.