What Your Klout Score Really Means | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

I selected this piece by Seth Stevenson for Epicenter Wired because whether we like it our not, Klout is definitlely infiltrating our lives personally and professionally according to the author and a recent article in Forbes  who are saying the same thing.


My commentary: I can understand that there has to be a way for businesses to sort through the masses and have some way of finding what they consider to be the best.

If your job requires you to be offline or in the field all day, you can't post on social networks, which is what Klout measures, therefore, your Klout score will be lower than someone else's who has a stronger presence than you and may or not be as competent as you are in your industry.


**I'd love to hear your comments about this - How do you feel about this because as I said, whether we like it or not, Klout exists and it is gaining momentum.


Your Klout score is gaining in importance: a high one might bring perks, but a low one could dash your career dreams or cause someone not to do business with you.


Here are some highlights:


**Much as Google’s search engine attempts to rank the relevance of every web page, Klout—a three-year-old startup based in San Francisco—is on a mission to rank the influence of every person online.


**Its algorithms comb through social media data:


**If you have a public account with Twitter, which makes updates available for anyone to read, you have a Klout score, whether you know it or not (unless you actively opt out on Klout’s website).


You can supplement that score by letting Klout link to harder-to-access accounts, like those on Google+, Facebook, or LinkedIn.


**The scores are calculated using variables that can include number of followers, frequency of updates, the Klout scores of your friends and followers, and the number of likes, retweets, and shares that your updates receive.


**High-scoring Klout users can qualify for Klout Perks, free goodies from companies hoping to garner some influential praise.


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/IuYXQL]