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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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Why Content Curation Is Disruptive and A Very Powerful Tool Done Right

Why Content Curation Is Disruptive and A Very Powerful Tool Done Right | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
janlgordon's insight:

This thought-provoking piece was written by Marty Smith who is one of our top scoopers here who knows what he's talking about when it comes to curation and why it is disruptive in this marketplace.


Marty gives you some great tips on how to use Scoopit to evaluate what works and what doesn't with your audience and more....


Marty Smith:




"When everyone is doing something as complicated as content marketing quality goes down. My ratios used to be about 50% curation to 50% creation. we can afford to lower creation now for two reasons:


  • An archive of almost a million words published across 4 blogs.
  • With so many people creating so much POOR content, creating LESS and making it BETTER is disruptive.
  • This “less and better” is  Curatti’s Editors of Chaos mission.


Snippet Curation with a powerful tool like Scoop.it moves your Internet marketing away from the pack. The pack is creating content faster and faster without a full understanding of what works


Most content marketers add NOISE in the hope screaming louder will make content stand out. It never does.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering, Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: [http://bit.ly/1aD3c6j]

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BSN's curator insight, November 13, 2013 1:00 PM

Content Marketing Tips

Stephen Dale's curator insight, November 14, 2013 12:59 PM

I've said this before, and will repeat...Contet Curation is not just for the Marketeers. I think it is as yet a vastly untapped skill/resource/process for Enterprise information professionals (IM/KM) in delivering themed, value--added and decision-ready content for their internal customers. #kmers #curation

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30 Ways to Build the “Know, Like, and Trust” Factor that Grows an Audience

30 Ways to Build the “Know, Like, and Trust” Factor that Grows an Audience | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Your content is good. You know your material. You know how to put words together in a way people want to read. You're nearly there. But the game isn't
janlgordon's insight:

I loved this article by copyblogger, it's one of those pieces that is full of great insights and strategy to help you focus on why you're online, who you're speaking to and how to create an impact and build a vital community.


Everyone of these suggestions is great, here are the ones that caught my attention:


10 Ways to Get Known Online


Great high-quality content marketing attracts attention, builds your reputation-it lets people see who you are and why you're worth listening to.


**Get a clear on who you're talking to: Identify your buyer personna and tightly position your content for that buyer.


**Be relevant: Listen, research, and ask questions to discover your audience’s pinch points. Package your ideas into thought-provoking blog posts, share solutions on a webinar, or drip ideas through an autoresponder.


**Get your social media ratio right. Remember the 95% relationship building, 5% selling formula.


**Be generous: Share content and promote other people. Don’t expect people to share your stuff if you don’t demonstrate a commitment to do the same.


**Initiate a two-way conversation: Invite your audience to engage and interact with you. Invite comments on your blog posts


10 factors that build trust with your audience


While you’re delivering your truly valuable content, you’re not selling, but you are paving the road to eventually selling a product that’s related to your content down the line.


**When it comes to selling online, authority and likeability alone are rarely enough — you need to become truly trusted.


**Give away (some of) your best stuff: The web is swamped with free content. If you want to stand out, even your free offers must be remarkable.


**Be consistently good: Train your audience to expect a certain level of quality from you and constantly deliver. When you do, they’ll come to you first rather than going elsewhere.


**Give your audience space: Use content to allow your audience to choose you — in their own time. Whether they come to you in a day, a week, or a decade, you’ll get far more respect than that sleazy salesman who just won’t go away.


Takeaway:


**When you combine the elements of know, like, and trust to your content and actions, magic ignites.


**You become an authority on your subject, and you build a tribe of fiercely loyal followers who can ultimately become loyal customers.


Selected and Reviewed by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


See full article here: [http://bit.ly/We01fT]


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Jeff Domansky's comment, January 17, 2013 2:48 PM
Jan, I always enjoy your curation. Keep the great material coming.
janlgordon's comment, January 19, 2013 12:36 AM
Thanks so much Jeff Domansky, I really appreciate your kind words!
Joe Winpisinger's comment, January 26, 2013 11:19 PM
Outstanding article... blogging is harder than most people think and that is why so many quit.... My blog is finally starting to pay off after a long while.... have to keep going even when only a few are reading... thanks...
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Content Curation is on the Verge of its 2nd Wave of Evolution!

Content Curation is on the Verge of its 2nd Wave of Evolution! | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

I was happy to see this article written by Beverly Macy, CEO of Gravity Summit, LLC and author of "The Power of Real Time Social Media", for the Huffington Post.  My very good friend Karan Bavandi is quoted in here and believe me, he really knows his stuff!

 

Here's what he said:

 

Karan Bavandi, Founder and CEO of KBucket , is a leading voice in this burgeoning area of content curation. KBucket seeks to be the Internet's first 'User Authored Search Content' site. "Curation is more than filtering the stream, its maintaining a topic," says Karan.

 

"A curator is someone with domain expertise who follows a topic, selects what's relevant, and then organizes the information in a way that helps us better understand the big picture. A serious curation solution combines organization and search as part of its offering."

 

Companies like KBucket will help bring the content ecosystem together by logically rating, tagging, and contextualizing the content to help us make sense of it. They'll provide tools to search and curate content and then help marketers mine the social influence that matters.

 

When that happens, social business might actually produce currency you can bank on. So let's remember that we at the very beginning of a cycle of innovation that will trump anything we've seen in a long time. That's a social bonanza.

 

It's not just about creation and distribution anymore. We are literally dismantling traditional structures of distribution and at the same time, building new forms of curated information dissemination.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/beverly-macy/living-in-the-stream-soci_b_928544.html?ref=email_share

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What is The Value of Questions and How Can Your Business Benefit From Them?

What is The Value of Questions and How Can Your Business Benefit From Them? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
janlgordon's insight:

This post was written by Andy Capaloff for Curatti


I love this article because as curator and a business owner being a provacateur is essential in instigating conversation and taking a topic to another level which can lead to all kinds of opportunities. There's an art to asking questions and this just first of many pieces on this topic that you'll find on Curatti


Something to ponder.......


How can you use leverage questions to benefit your business?


Can monetary value be placed on questions?  Not really, as there are too many variables involved. But depending on the timing and manner of delivery, questions can be the ingredient that spurs innovation and growth.

 

Here's are a few highlights:

 

The rhetorical question can spur conversation and wake up a

slumbering ideas process


The joking question can lift a mood


The incisive question can take a brilliant idea into a different stratosphere


The personal question can tell a person struggling in solitude that someone in the world cares


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: [http://curatti.com/the-value-of-questions/]

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5 Reasons Content Discovery Tools Need a Human Touch

5 Reasons Content Discovery Tools Need a Human Touch | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it


I really liked this article by Romain Goday from Darwin Ecosystem about content discovery tools and particularly the way he described the element of the "human touch" and why they go hand and hand.


His description of the human part of the equation eloquently describes the process of a content curation.


Intro:


Content discovery tools have been trending towards taking over an increasing part of the selection process by filtering out information.


Content Selection Should Remain a Vital Part of the User Experience


Excerpt:


While tools carry the advantage of computing and aggregating information quickly on the user’s behalf, the user possesses a number of natural skills that tools cannot adequately take the place of.


Here are a few of the most important ones, as they relate to selecting and identifying relevant content:


Users are contextual thinkers:


The relevance of a piece of information depends highly on the context of the informational need.


The motivation and goal of the user determines what information is important and what information is not.


Users possess relevant expertise: The user’s expertise helps them to predict the implications of a particular event.


It also allows the user to identify anomalies that take place in the usual development of an event based on their experience with the topic.


Users make sense of patterns: The human brain can easily understand the relationships between multiple events.


This ability to interpret patterns is critical to understand and identify what is going on and how it’s developing.


Curated by JanLGordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article:  [http://bit.ly/sUQxGs]

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